Probiotics

Intestinal Permeability, Leaky Gut, and Probiotics

Intestinal permeability or “leaky gut” is associated with inflammatory states, autoimmune issues, skin conditions, and bowel unease.

References

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  6. DiBaise, J. K., Zhang, H., Crowell, M. D., Krajmalnik-Brown, R., Decker, G. A., & Rittmann, B. E. (2008). Gut Microbiota and Its Possible Relationship With Obesity.Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 83(4), 460–469. doi:10.4065/83.4.460
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  9. Cutting, S. M. (2011). Food MicrobiologyBacillus probiotics. 28(2), 214–20. doi:10.1016/j.fm.2010.03.007
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